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From the Field

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Congratulations to the Cords lab!

Members of the Cords lab swept the poster awards at Northeastern Evolutionary Primatology meetings on November 8th and 9th.

Rachel Donabedian (center) won first prize, and Holly Fuong (left) and Amanda Johnston (right) tied for second.

The Tick App - YT Vid

E3B Professor Maria Diuk-Wasser and Postdoctoral Research Scientist Pilar Fernandez discuss fighting ticks with a tap of your phone.

The Tick App, created by Diuk-Wasser, is a free app aimed at combatting Lyme disease. You can track when and how you are exposed to ticks, while Diuk-Wasser and her team learn more about tick activity to identify areas of high tick risk and help prevent exposure. Click HERE to watch them discuss their study!

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Check out our E3Botanists! 

PhD student Patrick McKenzie and MA student Jared Meek spent their summer doing fieldwork in the Hengduan Mountains of China and Tibet for Professor Deren Eaton‘s lab.

10 day old House Sparrow-cropped

Our PhD student Stefanie Siller is out in Fargo, ND working on the impacts of intergenerational stress on house sparrows.

First, they color the house sparrow chicks to keep track of them in their nest. They then take measurements of the birds until they are 10 days old (as pictured above), the age at which they begin to fledge. Finally, they band them and hope the birds come back as adults!

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Congratulations to E3B PhD students Pooja Choksi, Sarika Khanwilkar, and Vijay Ramesh who received an Early Career Grant from National Geographic Society’s Committee for Research and Exploration for ‘Project Dhvani: Eavesdropping on Biodiversity for Ecological and Social Benefits’!

This grant will aid the Project Dhvani team to carry out fieldwork in central India during 2019 and 2020.

To find out more about Project Dhvani (Dhvani is the Sanskrit word for sound) and to stay updated on their work, click here!

TeamDhvani

Our PhD students Vijay Ramesh, Pooja Choksi, and Sarika Khanwilkar have received a grant from Advanced Consortium on Cooperation, Conflict, and Complexity (AC4) for Project Dhvani

The emerging technology of acoustics is opening a new window into capturing the diversity of sounds from insects, amphibians, birds, and mammals. Low-cost and time-efficient acoustic technology offers novel possibilities for a wide audience to appreciate biodiversity and for local resource managers to identify where and when diversity is under threat across areas of human-wildlife conflict. ‘Project Dhvani’ will use non-invasive audio recorders across a landscape of remarkable stronghold of biodiversity in India: the dry tropical forests of central India. This project will aim to understand how biodiversity varies across human-dominated land cover types in central India using sounds.

Project Dhvani is a collaborative undertaking of three young scientists, local non-governmental and academic institutions and the state Forest Departments in India. This team consists of Vijay Ramesh, who examines the effects of land-use and climate change on biodiversity; Pooja Choksi, who studies patterns of forest degradation and co-existence and Sarika Khanwilkar, who quantifies the relationships and feedback between people and the environment. You can learn more about the project at www.projectdhvani.org

More From the Field

News & Updates

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E3B Hiring Assistant Professor – The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology has a broad search for a tenure-track Assistant Professor. Click HERE to […] Read More

Congratulations to E3B professor Ruth DeFries on being named a Highly Cited Researcher for 2019! Each year, the Web of Science Group identifies the world’s most […] Read More

IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT: The Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology no longer requires GREs for admission to the Ph.D. or the M.A. program.

Congratulations to E3B PhD student Sebastian Heilpern! Sebastian won Best Student Talk in Aquatic Ecology for his presentation “Community consequences of indiscriminate overharvest in large tropical rivers” at […] Read More

A complete skull belonging to an early human ancestor has been recovered in Ethiopia. A composite of the 3.8 million-year-old cranium of Australopithecus anamensis is […] Read More

E3B Professor Ruth DeFries coauthored “The Amazon is in flames. But Brazil’s past can show the path forward.” for the Washington Post! Click the link to […] Read More

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